Monday, February 8, 2010

Winning Scones

I'm so excited to announce my detergent winner today!!

But first, I thought I'd share another recipe with you...so you can ALL be winners!

Awww......don't y'all just love me??

This recipe is for some downright delicious scones. Have 'em as breakfast, to go with your tea, or just as a nice treat. They are way better than the ones I've had at bakeries and coffee shops (in my ever so humble opinion). And they are sooooo easy to make. Make 'em enough and you'll easily have the recipe memorized! I wish I could tell you where I got the recipe, but I truly don't remember. I've had it for probably ten years, though I only made them for special party occasions. No longer, though! I make them frequently nowadays. And you can, too!!

Dried Fruit Cream Scones

2 c. flour
1 T. baking powder
½ tsp. salt
¼ c. sugar (or other dry substitute sweetener)
¾ c. dried apricots, chopped (or raisins, or dried cranberries, etc.)
1 ¼ c. heavy cream

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar in a bowl, stirring with a fork to mix well.

Right now I use 1 c. whole wheat flour and 1 c. all-purpose unbleached flour with the intention of gradually moving toward 100% whole wheat (AND soaking).


Add the 1 T. baking powder, 1/2 t. salt, and 1/4 c. sugar or other dry sweetener alternative. Mix lightly with fork.

Mix in 3/4 c. dried fruit (raisins, cranberries, cherries, chopped apricots, etc.).


Still using a fork, stir in the cream and mix until the dough holds together in a rough mass (the dough will be quite sticky). Lightly flour a board and transfer the dough to it.


Knead the dough 8 or 9 times.


Divide dough and pat into two separate circles, about six inches round each.

Now you're ready to add the glaze if you so choose.
Glaze:
3 T. butter, melted
2 T. sugar

For the glaze, spread the butter over the top and edges of the circles of dough, and sprinkle the sugar on top. Cut each circle in 8 wedges.


Use an ungreased baking sheet. Place each piece on the baking sheet, allowing about an inch between pieces.

Okay. That's not an inch between each piece. Oops.


There. That's better.

Bake for about 11 minutes, or until golden brown.

I've actually found they are quite delicious without the glaze, so I usually leave that part out. Gabriel is not much of a bread-family eater, though, so I sometimes smear a little butter over the top of a warm scone and sprinkle a little sugar on it for him. That seems to do the trick!

If you want to be really proper and eat your scones the English way, then you'll need some clotted cream or this cheater version. Pinch off a bite-sized amount of scone and then spread butter, jam, and cream onto your bite using your butter knife. However, the common (albeit "improper") way to do it is to first slice your freshly baked scone horizontally in half, spread butter on the inside of BOTH halves, spread some preserves or jam on BOTH halves, and then add a dollop of clotted cream to BOTH halves. It is pure decadence, my friend. Unbelievable really.

I like to make up a batch of these for breakfast, though we usually just eat them plain. I bake half and freeze the other half directly on the cookie sheet (before baking them). Once they're frozen, I stick them in a freezer bag to be baked some other morning (when I don't have time to think about breakfast). They usually only take a few minutes more to bake than usual.


I know you'll enjoy them. And I really enjoyed doing this giveaway. I'm glad to know so many are interested in using a more natural alternative for laundry detergent! I'm encouraged. So...does this mean y'all will listen to me preach about food, too??? *grin*

Amanda, you're the winner! I will contact you shortly to get your contact information. In the meantime, I hope the rest of you will consider giving the detergent recipe a try. And perhaps having scones for breakfast one day soon! Thank you all for entering! Be sure and come back to comment if any of you try these recipes. I'd love to know how they work out for you.


Easier to Read/Print Version:


Dried Fruit Cream Scones

2 c. all-purpose flour (I use 1 c. whole wheat flour and 1 c. all-purpose)
1 T. baking powder
½ tsp. salt
¼ c. sugar
¾ c. dried fruit, chopped if necessary
1 ¼ c. heavy cream

Glaze:
3 T. butter, melted
2 T. sugar
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Use an ungreased baking sheet. Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar in a bowl, stirring with a fork to mix well. Add the dried fruit. Still using a fork, stir in the cream and mix until the dough holds together in a rough mass (the dough will be quite sticky). Lightly flour a board and transfer the dough to it. Knead the dough 8 or 9 times. Pat into 2 circles, about 6 inches round. For the glaze, spread the butter over the top and edges of the circles of dough, and sprinkle the sugar on top. Cut each circle in 8 wedges, and place each piece on the baking sheet, allowing about an inch between pieces. Bake for about 11 minutes, or until golden brown.

6 comments:

  1. THANKS!
    And don't you just love the PC measure all cup?? I use mine all the time. (I used to sell PC in my former life) :)

    And I don't think I've had a scone since the last time I visited England, which means I've only ever eaten them the 'proper' way. I was a little freaked out when I heard it was called clotted cream. But it was oh so yummy!!!

    Thanks again for the detergent! I'm hoping this will get me hooked.

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  2. congrats to the winner....but darn! I thought we would maybe get to have lunch if I won! :)

    that recipe is very similar to my cream scones...love them!

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  3. Ooooo....those look and sound good! Thanks for sharing!

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  4. I promise to try out your recipe and listen to what you have to say about food - if you promise to never say or write "clotted cream" ever again.

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  5. Mimi has mentioned several times that I needed to get this recipe from you. Now there's one less thing to remember to do in this lifetime! :)

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  6. I can vouch for these scones...I ate way too many of them at Saylor's "tea party". Also, at Christmas, a teacher at my husband's school gave me a couple of scones she had made....the recipe came from her grandmother who was from Dublin. They tasted just like Lori's, so Lori.....your scones must be the "real thing".

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